Breakfast Deviled Eggs

20190312_221348Potlucks are great because you get to try a whole bunch of different foods while only making one dish. I frequently organize them with my work colleagues, and our most recent potluck was “heritage” themed. Everyone was encouraged to bring a dish that they associated with their family, upbringing, and/or culture – ideally they would be dishes that were a bit outside the mainstream. We had a fabulous time and I ate a bunch of food I’d never even heard of, let alone tried. My contribution was my family’s “secret recipe” peanut butter deviled eggs (sorry but I can’t share the recipe on pain of death). Being me, I also brought two additional types of deviled eggs – traditional, and these breakfast deviled eggs that I invented spur of the moment. I guess my heritage is WASP/Midwest United States?

The details:

Jump to recipe

Thought process:

Deviled eggs (originally “of the devil” because they are zesty. Oh, puritans) are a great platform for experimentation. The base recipe is simple – eggs and mayo – and as long as you CONFINE yourself to additions that can 1) go with those flavors and 2) physically mix in to the filling, you’ll probably do well. At the time of my spontaneous invention of this recipe, I had a ton of potatoes growing eyes in my pantry. Thinking eggs and potatoes, I immediately went to breakfast potatoes, and the rest was built on that.

How to hard boil eggs – Ohhh, there’s so much advice on the internet about this. The uncertainty comes from the fact that you can’t know how it went until you’ve peeled and cut it, at which point it’s too late. Additionally, not every egg is the same size, and not every person or recipe wants their eggs cooked to the same extent. For a while, I have been using the method of putting eggs in a pot of cold water, bringing to a boil, removing from the heat for 12 minutes, then removing the eggs to the fridge. This usually works pretty well but I recently read an article arguing for a similar method, but putting the eggs into boiling water and then cooking slightly longer – 13-14 minutes. This makes a lot of sense to me, because the amount of time it takes the water to boil will vary based on the amount of water in the pot and your eggs will be slowly cooking that entire time. So putting the eggs into already-boiling water eliminates that variability. I will try this method in the future and report back.

Below, the recipe:

Breakfast Deviled Eggs

  • 4 hard boiled eggs, cooled completely
  • 1 slice bacon
  • 1 small yellow potato, peeled and diced very small
  • 1/2 small onion, very small dice
  • 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1/4 tsp kosher salt
  • pinch cayenne
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/2 tsp yellow mustard
  • 1/4 tsp Tabasco sauce
  • 1 Tbsp grated cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 tsp finely chopped parsley
  1. In a small nonstick skillet fry the bacon over medium heat until very crispy. Remove to a paper towel lined plate to drain the chop finely.
  2. Toss the potatoes and onions with olive oil, paprika, salt, and cayenne
  3. Add to pan and saute over medium high heat stirring very frequently until browned and crispy
  4. Remove shells from hard boiled eggs and cut in half long ways
  5. Remove yolks to a medium bowl and set whites on serving plate
  6. Smash yolks with a fork until very finely ground
  7. Stir into yolks mayonnaise, mustard, Tabasco, cheddar, parsley, 2 Tbsp potato mixture, and 1 Tbsp bacon
  8. Taste and adjust seasoning
  9. Transfer filling to piping bag with a wide tip and pipe into whites on serving tray
  10. Garnish with a bit of extra bacon and potato for extra cuteness
  11. These are best served the same day they are filled, but eggs can be hard boiled ahead of time

Rating:

4/5 stars.  4 stars
These were quite tasty, and different from the usual hard boiled egg. I put a bit too much salt in mine, but I’ve adjusted the recipe accordingly.

One thought on “Breakfast Deviled Eggs

  1. Pingback: Breakfast Deviled Eggs — Results Not Guaranteed | My Meals are on Wheels

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